France Decides Not To Use The Internet After All

French Pirate Party freedom poster

Thanks to Jeff Ubois for bringing this one to our attention...

Internet users in France who illegally download too many times will risk having their Internet connection taken away by court order. No, I'm not making this up: read about it in The Guardian, Tech Crunch, The New York Times, and the French Pirate Party's page (with English) about it.

The French Pirate Party (PPF), at the above link and elsewhere, is doing a good job of articulating what's wrong with this — aside from the fact that the content providers don't need their own taxpayer-funded private police force anyway, that is. As the PPF points out, the new measure will result in:

Pimps and Ferrets: Copyright and Culture in the United States, 1831-1891

This may be of interest to the QCO crowd. Eric Anderson has put his dissertation, "Pimps and Ferrets: Copyright and Culture in the United States, 1831-1891" online under a Creative Commons license. I notice he's at Bowling Green University, home of the Browne Popular Culture Library, an amazing repository of American popular culture (post 1876). If you ever find yourselves in Western OH, do take a trip to the library!

Interview with Bob Ostertag: Releasing an Album Free on the Internet

Bob Ostertag

Bob Ostertag is a musician and experimental audio artist based in San Francisco. He has been performing and recording since the 1970s. In October of 2007, I interviewed him about the release of his new album, w00t, a collage of computer game sound and image that began as the sound for Special Forces, a live cinema piece by Living Cinema (Pierre Hébert and Bob Ostertag). Bob is one of a growing number of musicians who have decided to release their music for free Internet download. Even within this group, Bob is unusually progressive — or as I prefer to think of it, ahead of the curve: he chose a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 license, which allows not only downloading at no charge, but the freedom to make derivative works and to make commercial use of the music, for example as the sound for a live performance for which tickets are sold.

In October 2007, I conducted the following interview with Bob about the album's release. (Note: between our previous article by him and now, Bob joined the board of directors of


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