Eben Moglen talks in New York City: "Snowden and the Future".

Eben Moglen speaking.Eben Moglen will be giving a series of four public talks in New York City, entitled "Snowden and the Future", starting Wednesday, October 4th (the other dates are Oct. 30th, Nov 13th, and Dec 4th, all Wednesdays).

All talks will take place at Columbia Law School, in room 101 of Jerome Greene Hall (map), from 4:30pm - 5:30pm.  For those who can't be there, streaming video of the events as they take place will be available from snowdenandthefuture.info.

Why you should go to these talks:

The connection between copyright restrictions and civil liberties violations is clear and unavoidable.  We've written about it here (and here and here and here).  It's been the key to the Pirate Party's political success in Europe, and the subject of one of Nina Paley's excellent minute memes.  Eben Moglen,  the founder and director of the Software Freedom Law Center, is one of the clearest thinkers talking about digital freedom today -- and one of the most inspiring: a previous public lecture of his led directly to the creation of the Freedom Box Foundation.  He's also a terrific speaker.  You won't be disappointed; go, and bring all your friends.

The surveillance state is aided and enabled by information monopolists who assert that watching people's Internet usage for unauthorized use of copyrighted material is so important that it trumps both privacy concerns and freedom of expression.  That's why we keep a close eye on surveillance news here at QuestionCopyright.org, and encourage you to as well.

For more information on these lectures, visit snowdenandthefuture.info.

Tags: 

We Pledged $500 to the Tupi Animation Software Kickstarter campaign -- join us?

Tupi logo.

QuestionCopyright.org has pledged $500.00 to the Tupi 2D Animation Software Kickstarter campaign, and we're posting this to help spread the word.

Please join us and the other project backers, with whatever amount you can pledge!  Remember, your pledge is only called in if Tupi reaches their $30,000 goal by September 26th.

Tupi is already runnable code.  They're on version 0.2 right now, and their goal in this campaign is to reach their 1.0 feature set, including installers for Macintosh and Windows.  (It's already packaged for Debian and Ubuntu GNU/Linux; I've installed it.)

Our Artist-in-Residence Nina Paley (who also backed Tupi's campaign personally) explained very well why projects like Tupi are important, in her post "It's 2013.  Do you know where my Free vector animation software is?".  When you're an artist, you're dependent on your tools — and that means when someone has a monopoly over your tools, they can play havoc with your art and your livelihood.  That's exactly what happened with Adobe's Macromedia Flash 8.  Read Nina's post for the details, but basically Adobe decided to remove features from their Flash authoring software, in order to sell those features separately in other programs.  As Nina points out, the problem with this isn't just the extra expense, it's the increase in workload and production time.  And the looming threat that they might do it again in the next version.  They can yank the rug out from under their users at any time, and there's nothing the users can do about it, except refuse to upgrade (which becomes less and less feasible as time goes on, of course).

Free, open source programs can't do this to their users, because no one has a monopoly over the software.  If one group puts out a version of the software that is missing important features, users will shrug and start using a competing fork that treats them better.  It also means that if enough artists need a particular bugfix or improvement in the software, they have a path to make it happen — they don't have to be programmers, as long as they can band together and hire programmers.  Users are not vulnerable to arbitrary decisions handed down from management, they way they are with proprietary software.  (Of course, the more likely scenario is that artists would band together and just pay Tupi's original development team to make the necessary changes.  The fact that the users have the option to go elsewhere is precisely what makes the original authors likely to be responsive to true demand — a free-market ideal that proprietary software is structurally biased against attaining.)

Tupi has another thing going for it: Nina, an extremely experienced animator who knows the major competing proprietary tool very well, has publicly volunteered to test and provide feedback to open source animation projects, including Tupi.  (Nina says "Tupi’s strength is its simplicity; it’s great for kids and anyone new to animation. It doesn’t yet have the power I need to produce feature films, but its development is a good thing for all of us. ...")

So please help spread the word about Tupi's Kickstarter campaign! (Here are links to retweet or redent our posts about it.)  You can read more about Tupi here, and this is their campaign video:

Tags: 

Free-culture Project "Lunatics!" is back on Kickstarter

After an additional year of production work, our free-film project "Lunatics!" is back up on Kickstarter. We have a lot more done - some "finished" animation, voice acting and soundtrack mixing, a lot more completed 3D models, including some of the toughest mech modeling, and several characters. We are still 100% free-culture, using CC By-SA license for everything we release, and we're still open-source, making our models and other elements available to the commons. We use only music with By-SA compatible licenses, and we are working entirely with free-software, especially Blender, Kdenlive, and Audacity.

Tags: 

Pages

Subscribe to QuestionCopyright.org RSS