Want To Be a Legal Intern at QuestionCopyright.org?

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Calling all law students — or at least the ones who weren't planning to work for the RIAA later:

Our legal intern position is open! We're looking for someone interested in learning more about copyright law and using it to promote freedom. Several of our projects have legal components, so the responsibilities of the position are varied. They will involve research in U.S. and international copyright law, non-profit law (federal and CA state), some trademark law, tracking legislative developments, some writing, etc. The minimum time commitment is about five hours a week, with more available if you want it. A New York City location is preferred but not required. There may be some limited travel (which we pay for), at your discretion.

The position is unpaid, but you would be working with an experienced lawyer (our counsel, Karen Sandler), and we're happy to meet reasonable requirements for law school credit.

Interested? Contact us. We'll keep the posting open until we get the right candidate — it could be you!

QuestionCopyright.org receives $10,000 grant from Kahle/Austin Foundation.

We're very pleased to announce a $10,000 grant from the Kahle/Austin Foundation, received in the first few days of 2011!

Our team is still considering how best to allocate this New Year's gift, but it will likely be divided between projects and fundraising (turns out it costs money to raise money, and we were right in the middle of a grantwriting effort, so this is perfect timing).

If you like our work, please consider joining Kahle/Austin in supporting us.  We are a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, so donations are tax-deductible in the U.S.  Your support means we can make more Minute Memes, help other artists try out the freedom-friendly audience-distribution model used so successfully by our Artist-in-Residence Nina Paley, and do many other things to help make the world safe for sharing again.

Many thanks to the Kahle/Austin Foundation, and to our board member Brewster Kahle.

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Falkvinge steps down at Swedish Pirate Party; Troberg steps up.

Swedish Pirate Party Flag   Portait of Anna Troberg   Portait of Rick Falkvinge

On January 1st, Rick Falkvinge, the founder of the Swedish Pirate Party and its leader for the past five years, stepped down, and Anna Troberg took over the reins.

This is significant for a few reasons. The Swedish Pirate Party is clearly here to stay — having won seats (yes, that's plural, "seats") in the European Parliament, they are now concentrating on in-country elections. The leadership transition is a sign of stability: Falkvinge recognized that what the party needed now was an organization builder with new ideas, felt he'd done his best work in founding the Party and leading it to its first victories, and moved on. By all accounts Anna Troberg is exactly the right person for the job.

Rick Falkvinge will now be able to concentrate on political evangelism full time at his English-language site: Falkvinge on Infopolicy. In his words:

"...I feel there has been a language barrier from the Swedish discussion, which is several years ahead, to the rest of the world. I want to bridge that."

This is welcome news, because here in the U.S. we need more of what might be called the "Swedish School" of copyright reform.

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