A Month Since Internet Archive Fire -- Donations Being Matched 3-to-1 before 2014!

It's been a little over a month since the November 6th fire that destroyed the scanning center building at the Internet Archive.  No one was hurt, but as Archive founder Brewster Kahle wrote in a blog post from November 6th (emphasis added):

We lost maybe 20 boxes of books and film, some irreplaceable, most already digitized, and some replaceable.   From our point of view this is the worst part.   We lost an array cameras, lights, and scanning equipment worth hundreds of thousands of dollars.  Insurance will cover some but not all of this.

The Internet Archive is far more important to the long-term interests of Internet users than, say, Facebook, and they'll make a little go a long way.  If you can, please donate to help them recover and grow.  I just sent in a check for $200 -- which really means $800 for the Archive, because...

Donations made before 2014 are being matched three-to-one by an anonymous donor!

So, if you can, please give.  There are few more obvious calls on the Internet right now!

Internet Archive, showing fire damage to scanning center building.

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Two Moglen events you should hear -- this Wednesday, and next Thursday.

I can't stress this enough — if you're still wondering about the connection between copyright and civil liberties, nothing could make it clearer than Eben Moglen's four-lecture series Snowden and the Future at Columbia Law School in New York City. The fourth lecture is this coming Wednesday, December 4th, at 4:30pm (Eastern US) in Room 101 of Jerome Greene Hall:

If you are in New York City on Wednesday, we strongly recommend going to that fourth and last lecture. Transcripts of the first three are already online (though I found them worth watching on video). Quoting from the third:

privacy is an ecological rather than a transactional substance

Moglen goes on to explain why very eloquently. It is a point of prime concern to copyright resistors: when every email, every post in a social network, every online communication among human beings, is subject to surveillance, then the system will always err in one direction: toward over-enforcement of already overly-strong restrictions. Surveillance naturally serves monopoly: the watcher is centralized, the watched decentralized. Thus, for example, it becomes your problem to fight fraudulent takedowns and other censorship, rather than being the censor's problem to justify the restrictions in the first place.

Thursday, 12 Dec: Eben Moglen and Bruce Schneier:

Then on Thursday the 12th at 6:30pm ET, Prof. Moglen will be talking with the renowned security expert Bruce Schneier about what we can learn from the Edward Snowden documents and from the NSA's efforts to weaken global cryptography, and how we can keep free software tools from being subverted. That event is also at Jerome Greene Hall; see here for details.


There is no freedom of thought without freedom of communication, and ultimately there is no freedom of communication without privacy. Privacy means secrecy, anonymity, and autonomy for individuals freely associating.

Monopoly will never argue for this. People have to do it. Copyright restrictions originated in centralized censorship and are increasingly supported by centralized surveillance. No one is analyzing the larger dynamic of surveillance better than Prof. Moglen. If you're in New York this Wednesday and next Thursday, you know where to go.


(Previous post in this series here.)

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Eben Moglen talks in New York City: "Snowden and the Future".

Eben Moglen speaking.Eben Moglen will be giving a series of four public talks in New York City, entitled "Snowden and the Future", starting Wednesday, October 4th (the other dates are Oct. 30th, Nov 13th, and Dec 4th, all Wednesdays).

All talks will take place at Columbia Law School, in room 101 of Jerome Greene Hall (map), from 4:30pm - 5:30pm.  For those who can't be there, streaming video of the events as they take place will be available from snowdenandthefuture.info.

Why you should go to these talks:

The connection between copyright restrictions and civil liberties violations is clear and unavoidable.  We've written about it here (and here and here and here).  It's been the key to the Pirate Party's political success in Europe, and the subject of one of Nina Paley's excellent minute memes.  Eben Moglen,  the founder and director of the Software Freedom Law Center, is one of the clearest thinkers talking about digital freedom today -- and one of the most inspiring: a previous public lecture of his led directly to the creation of the Freedom Box Foundation.  He's also a terrific speaker.  You won't be disappointed; go, and bring all your friends.

The surveillance state is aided and enabled by information monopolists who assert that watching people's Internet usage for unauthorized use of copyrighted material is so important that it trumps both privacy concerns and freedom of expression.  That's why we keep a close eye on surveillance news here at QuestionCopyright.org, and encourage you to as well.

For more information on these lectures, visit snowdenandthefuture.info.

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