Free-culture Project "Lunatics!" is back on Kickstarter

After an additional year of production work, our free-film project "Lunatics!" is back up on Kickstarter. We have a lot more done - some "finished" animation, voice acting and soundtrack mixing, a lot more completed 3D models, including some of the toughest mech modeling, and several characters. We are still 100% free-culture, using CC By-SA license for everything we release, and we're still open-source, making our models and other elements available to the commons. We use only music with By-SA compatible licenses, and we are working entirely with free-software, especially Blender, Kdenlive, and Audacity.

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Bob Ostertag On Trying Freedom.

Bob Ostertag at work.

This piece by Bob Ostertag was originally published at On The Commons. We're reprinting it here because it's a great description of exactly how distribution networks are still strongly weighted against free-as-in-freedom. The cost of maintaining the monopoly sidewalk is that freedom can grow only in the cracks — and the increasingly eager auto-detection bots keep "repairing" the cracks, because their masters only see the value of the sidewalk. Bob is an active performing and recording musician, and a long-time friend of QuestionCopyright.org (he was one of our founding Board members). His biography is at the end of this article.

We of course hope Bob makes plenty of money from A Book of Hours on CD Baby — there's no contradiction between freedom-friendly licensing and making money! And yes, we recognize the contradiction between his original Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial licensing and the freedom of other artists to pursue the same strategy Bob describes below while incorporating his music in their works. In the usual QCO so-transparent-it's-kind-of-edgy fashion, we'll discuss this with Bob and see if he's open to using truly free licensing while still selling his music on CDBaby and similar sites [Update 2013-08: He was, and we're now working with him to relicense his music under free licenses wherever possible.]. But the outcome of that conversation doesn't affect his message below, which is that right now freedom is much harder work than it needs to be, because the major distribution networks still regard it as a weed, and because the few distributors that prioritize a direct audience-artist financial connection are small and don't have the clout — yet — to change how the sidewalks are maintained.

Update from Bob Ostertag

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Doing it right: Suing Warner/Chappell for copyfraud because "Happy Birthday" song is in the public domain.

Happy Birthday cupcake.A documentary film company making a movie about the "Happy Birthday" song has filed a lawsuit against the music monopolist Warner/Chappell, asking it to return the hundreds of millions of dollars it has collected over the years in improper royalties for the public domain song "Happy Birthday".

Claiming a monopoly they don't even have, and then extorting people for it?  I just have no problem with suing over that.  This issue has been raised for years, but the amount Warner/Chappell asks from any given target is always less than it would cost to fight it in court, so people just paid up.  Until now.  (Warner/Chappell is hardly alone in this business model, by the way.)

The evidence in the filing looks pretty thorough, too (thanks to Techdirt and BoingBoing for their posts on this):

The full lawsuit, embedded below, goes through a detailed history of the song and any possible copyright claims around it. It covers the basic history of "Good Morning to You," but also notes that the "happy birthday" lyrics appeared by 1901 at the latest, citing a January 1901 edition of Inland Educator and Indiana School Journal which describes children singing a song called "happy birthday to you." They also point to a 1907 book that uses a similar structure for a song called "good-bye to you" which also notes that you can sing "happy birthday to you" using the same music. In 1911, the full "lyrics" to Happy Birthday to You were published, with a notation that it's "sung to the same tune as 'Good Morning.'" There's much more in the history basically showing that the eventual copyright that Warner/Chappell holds is almost entirely unrelated to the song Happy Birthday to You.

The Techdirt post shows the full text of the suit.

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