"We Don't Want Everything For Free. We Just Want Everything"

Everything.Recently, I gave a Sita Sings the Blues talk to a roomful of 15-to-17-year-olds. Near the end I explained Free Culture and my stance against copyright, which led to some interesting discussion. Turns out most of them are manga fans, and familiar with publishers’ complaints about scanned and translated manga shared freely online. They all read them anyway (except one, who prefers to read entire manga in the bookstore). I asked them how they would choose to support artists they liked (once they had some disposable income) and they said:

 

  1. Donate buttons – with the qualification that they want to know as much as possible about where the donation is going. They said honesty and transparency are important.
  2. Kickstarter – They all knew about it (which was notable because none of them had heard of Flattr) and valued pitch videos that explained how the money would be used.
  3. Custom drawings
  4. Merch
  5. Physical copies
  6. Live Shared Experiences, including ballet, museum exhibits, and concerts. The event aspect was important; they wanted to be able to say, “Remember that one time when that awesome show was here…” They agreed seeing things in person is a more powerful experience than seeing things online, and worth spending more on. One said she would buy CD at a live show because “it reminds you of the show.”
  7. One said he would support artists by promoting their work to his friends.

Semi-related, I took an informal poll of how many would prefer to read a book on paper vs. an e-reader. The vast majority said paper, but what they really seemed to want was dual formats: paper copies to read comfortably and collect, and digital copies to search and reference. Makes sense to me. Only two of them had iPads, and none used them for “enhanced eBooks.”

My favorite quote of the afternoon, from a 15-year-old girl:

“We don’t want everything for free. We just want everything.

crossposted from ninapaley.com

Karen Sandler of QCO on Free Content Panel at SXSW.

QuestionCopyright.org's pro bono General Counsel Karen Sandler took part in a panel this past Wednesday at the music conference of South by Southwest: Set Your Content Free (It’s Harder Than You Think).

Moderated by Michael Petricone of the Consumer Electronics Association, the panel also had Hank Shocklee (of Bomb Squad/Public Enemy fame), Julie Samuels of EFF, and Paul Geller of Grooveshark:

 

2012 SXSW Free Content panel participants.

 

Karen's writeup is over at her GNOMG blog, so please check it out there (for the sake of keeping comments centralized in one place).

Many thanks to Karen for representing!  And note her awesome t-shirt: you can have one too.

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Stationers Company Redux: The Privatization of the Information Police Force

Putting the Internet in jail.As reader libreuniverse pointed out in forwarding this, this is big, big news: large Internet service providers, on whom millions of people depend for their Internet service, are going to start acting as copyright police:

"RIAA chief: ISPs to start policing copyright by July 12"

 

The short version: each ISP will maintain a database of "repeat offenders", with gradually escalating punishments, starting with warning letters, then moving to slowing down the subscriber's connection, and finally to cutting them off altogether.

This is going to hurt artists.  It's going to drive unauthorized copying even further underground, onto the so-called "dark networks" where people use encryption and other forms of indirection to hide from the network provider (and therefore from everyone else except the intended recipient) what's being copied.  Use of such techniques is already widespread, and now it will become common and normal.  This means artists don't get credit for their popularity: it becomes more and more difficult for an artist to tell who likes them and where and why, because all of the sharing and the commenting and recommendation that goes along with it gets driven underground.  The ISPs are essentially forcing fans to hide their love of their favorite artists.

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