Our New Headquarters.

 

The new QCO headquarters.

Well, it's been a long time coming: we moved into our new headquarters this weekend.  As you can see, at last there's room for all our staff -- no more doubling up at desks, no more working in shifts, no more waiting lists for parking spaces.  We're really looking forward to finally being able to fit everyone at the all-hands meetings!

Many thanks to the recent donors who made this possible, especially the RIAA, MPAA, and Disney.  Without their steadfast support, we wouldn't be where we are today.

Modern, state-of-the-art buildings like this don't come cheap, of course.  Although we're convinced the new headquarters is the right decision for the organization, we thought it would be wise to start a capital campaign now to cover grounds maintenance, heating and cooling, electricity, and, of course, the snack budget.  There's a full kitchen on every floor -- our dedicated associates will need fuel to fight for your freedoms effectively.

If you'd like to support us in our new home, please donate today!

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Sing it, Leah Day! Standing Up Against "Copyright Terrorism" in Quilting.

Example of quilt designs from Leah Day.

There's a terrific article by Leah Day entitled "Copyright Terrorism", over at the Free Motion Quilting Project.

While we usually try to avoid the T-word over here at Question Copyright, so as not to inflate the language in an already loud debate, the substance of Day's article is right on.  The growing problem she describes in quilting is the full-grown problem we already have in literature, music, and elsewhere:

Copyright issues seem to be cropping up with increasing frequency in the quilting world and I for one would like to try to stem this flow, or at least open your eyes, to the very real threat looming for our craft.

What is this threat?  Where is it coming from?

It is coming from within our own ranks. Quilters with a certain penchant for copyright and legal wrangling are turning our open, creative craft into a mine field of rules, regulations, licensing, attribution, and copyright lockdown that it's enough to make anyone set down their rotary cutter and sell their sewing machine.

My favorite passage:

My question is this: is this the world we want to create? 

Is this the industry we want to build, where quilters who quilt for a living must live in fear that they will be sued for the designs they use?  That a blogger trying to teach and spread the love of free motion quilting can be threatened for using the wrong design? That quilters who quilt for show must credit every designer involved in their quilt, down to the fabric and thread manufacturer?

She then goes on to give an example, and points out the insidious positive feedback loop that happens once people start suing.

Read the whole thing.

"We Don't Want Everything For Free. We Just Want Everything"

Everything.Recently, I gave a Sita Sings the Blues talk to a roomful of 15-to-17-year-olds. Near the end I explained Free Culture and my stance against copyright, which led to some interesting discussion. Turns out most of them are manga fans, and familiar with publishers’ complaints about scanned and translated manga shared freely online. They all read them anyway (except one, who prefers to read entire manga in the bookstore). I asked them how they would choose to support artists they liked (once they had some disposable income) and they said:

 

  1. Donate buttons – with the qualification that they want to know as much as possible about where the donation is going. They said honesty and transparency are important.
  2. Kickstarter – They all knew about it (which was notable because none of them had heard of Flattr) and valued pitch videos that explained how the money would be used.
  3. Custom drawings
  4. Merch
  5. Physical copies
  6. Live Shared Experiences, including ballet, museum exhibits, and concerts. The event aspect was important; they wanted to be able to say, “Remember that one time when that awesome show was here…” They agreed seeing things in person is a more powerful experience than seeing things online, and worth spending more on. One said she would buy CD at a live show because “it reminds you of the show.”
  7. One said he would support artists by promoting their work to his friends.

Semi-related, I took an informal poll of how many would prefer to read a book on paper vs. an e-reader. The vast majority said paper, but what they really seemed to want was dual formats: paper copies to read comfortably and collect, and digital copies to search and reference. Makes sense to me. Only two of them had iPads, and none used them for “enhanced eBooks.”

My favorite quote of the afternoon, from a 15-year-old girl:

“We don’t want everything for free. We just want everything.

crossposted from ninapaley.com

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