August break.

The Beach

Hey, everyone.  This is the time of year when QuestionCopyright.org traditionally slows down.  Our global headquarters empties out as everyone hits the road for some much-needed sunshine, family time, etc,

We may not be completely inactive this month, but let's just say you probably don't want QCO to be your primary news source for August.

See you in September, and enjoy your summer (or winter, if you're in the Southern hemisphere).

 

"Lunatics" Free-Culture Series -- Pilot Episode Kickstarter

Terry Hancock is an editor at QuestionCopyright.org, a prolific writer about free software and free culture, and a driving force behind Lunatics, the crowd-funded and freely-licensed science fiction web TV series — about which he brings us an update:

We had a successful Kickstarter back in December to fund pre-production for Lunatics (mainly the character design), and now we're running another much larger Kickstarter to fund the production of a pilot. This is probably the hardest step for the Lunatics Project: in order to get a sustainable cycle of support for a free-culture series (Lunatics will be released under the Creative Commons By-SA license), we first have to find people willing to risk a little on producing our very first episode. Fortunately, we've got a great team together already, and it's clear that the pilot will be really good -- but only we can get funded to pay the artists for the time they need to work on it.

 

UPDATE: Although this was canceled we are near the end of a replacement campaign to pay for just the next step, which is Voice and Audio Production with an Animatic

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Summertime in the Department of Easy Refutations.

Big IdeasThe Atlantic magazine has put out its yearly Ideas Issue.  I always look forward to it -- sure, not all of the ideas are great, and many are questionable, but that's to be expected when a lot of ideas are gathered together.  They're often still instructive, sometimes the more so for being deliberately provocative.

But every so often, there's one whose most interesting characteristic is that it managed to get past the editors at all.  This year, it's from Elizabeth Wurtzel, and it reads, in full:

Of the Founders’ genius ideas, few trump intellectual-property rights. At a time when Barbary pirates still concerned them, the Framers penned an intellectual-property clause—the world’s first constitutional protection for copyrights and patents. In so doing, they spawned Hollywood, Silicon Valley, Motown, and so on. Today, we foolishly flirt with undoing that. In a future where all art is free (the future as pined for by Internet pirates and Creative Commons zealots), books, songs, and films would still get made. But with nobody paying for them, they’d be terrible. Only people who do lousy work do it for free.

Er.  Where to start?  The vertigo-inducing ahistoricity?  The clumsy attempt at guilt-by-association through a spurious double mention of pirates?  The unexamined assumption that copyright restrictions are how artists get paid?

Or how about just with a rewrite:

Of the Founders’ genius ideas, few trump intellectual-property rights. At a time when Barbary pirates still concerned them, the Framers penned an intellectual-property clause—the world’s first constitutional protection for copyrights and patents—into a justly famous document that they composed for no compensation and that was in the public domain from the moment it was first published. In so doing, they spawned Hollywood, Silicon Valley, Motown, and so on. Today, we foolishly flirt with undoing that. In a future where all art is free (the future as pined for by Internet pirates and Creative Commons zealots), books, songs, and films would still get made. But with nobody paying for them, they’d be terrible. Only people who do lousy work do it for free.

My suggested edits are in red.

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