Copyright "restrictions": Farhad Manjoo of the NYT uses accurate language.

Books in a jail cell.At QCO we make a point of calling things by their right names, and of encouraging others to do so.  For example, we always talk about "copyright restrictions", instead of using the pro-monopoly propaganda word "copyright protection".  Try it yourself: if you consistently substitute restrict for protect, and restriction for protection, when talking about copyright, it will always work grammatically and it will be more accurate.

The information monopoly industries would much prefer us to talk about "protection", of course, by which they mean protection of their business model.  But most of us don't say "pre-owned car" just because used car dealers would rather we said that instead of "used car", and we can use the same principle of calling things what they are when it comes to copyright.

However, most media outlets (not to mention even other copyright reformers and abolitionists, sadly) still usually take the path of least resistance and continue using the term "protection".  This may be partly because it lends an air of legalistic authority: lawyers almost always call it "protection", not just for copyrights but also in the unfortunately consonant phrase "patent protection" and in the conceptually incoherent "intellectual property protection".

That's why I nearly jumped out of my airplane seat when I opened the New York Times this Friday, April 25th, and saw Farhad Manjoo's article "The Cloud Roots for Aereo, but People Need Better".  It was the first time I'd seen anyone in a major mainstream media publication use the term "copyright restrictions" where most journalists would have said "copyright protections".  Here's the exact excerpt, starting from the beginning of the article:

"The best way to think about Aereo, the company at the center of this week's Supreme Court battle over the future of computing, is as as an example of legal performance art.  Aero is based entirely on a legalistic leap of faith: If it's legal to set up an antenna and record a TV show at your own house, which it is, shouldn't it also be legal to rent an antenna and server space at a big data center, and then stream the show over the Internet to your computer, tablet or set-top box?

 

It's a clever argument, one that highlights the extreme lengths that tech companies go to to avoid copyright restrictions. ..."

Not only that, he never refers to restrictions as "protection" anywhere in the article.  Later he even repeats "restrict", again accurately, and with a directness that has been too often missing from many others' writings on this topic:

"Aereo is based on a loophole. To offer TV shows over the Internet, most streaming services like Netflix or Hulu pay licensing fees to studios. But licensing is expensive and restrictive; ..."

Why, it's almost as if he's determined to report what's actually going on!

I've been a fan of Farhad Manjoo for a while, so it's gratifying to see him taking such care with language here.  But just to be clear, there's no behind-the-scenes nudging going on, at least not by me: I've never met nor communicated with Manjoo.  Also, we have no reason to count him (or for that matter not count him) among those for radical reform or abolition of the current copyright system.  I don't know anything about his political beliefs in this area, and his insistence on using accurate language doesn't say anything about those beliefs.  It just tells us he's trying to be a good writer, one who uses the most appropriate word despite environmental pressure to do otherwise.  Let's hope he influences some of his colleagues to be equally accurate.

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Fourth RE/Mixed Media Festival in NYC -- April 26-27 at the New School.

RE/Mixed Media Festival logo.

We've been fans of what the RE/Mixed Media Festival is up to ever since we first heard about it in 2010.  Now they're in their fourth year!  The next one will take place at the New School in New York City, the weekend of April 26-27.  They've kindly offered our readers a registration discount, too -- use the promotional code "QUESTION" to get 50% off.

In their own words:

RE/Mixed Media Festival, taking place on April 26-27 at The New School and CultureHub, is an annual celebration of collaborative art-making and creative appropriation. It's the artists' contribution to the ongoing conversation about remixing, mashups, copyright law, fair use, and the freedom of artists to access their culture in order to build upon it. Each year, the festival features performances, panel discussions, workshops, electronic remixing/hacking, sampling, film & video, fashion, DJs, technology, interactive installations, painting, sculpture, software, and much more.

Now in it's fourth year, RE/Mixed Media Festival is a hybrid event - a marriage of art exhibition and critical academic conference, a forum where artists, activists, scholars, musicians, writers, entertainment professionals, and policymakers come together to collectively re-examine the role of creative appropriation in the arts, and the roles of artists, government and industry in creating and maintaining a free and open culture.

RE/Mixed Media Festival IV is pleased to welcome media theorist Lev Manovich and author David Shields as keynote speakers, as well as the NY opening of DJ Spooky's international art and design exhibit, The Imaginary App. Other 2014 artists hail from 13 countries, and include 15 students, alumni, and faculty from The New School of Public Engagement's School of Media Studies and Parsons The New School for Design. Past artists and scholars have included Moby, Steinski, Ricky Powell, Ryuichi Sakamoto, Jesper Juul, Nitin Sawhney and over 150 other artists, performers, educators, activists, musicians and DJs.

Details:

   Saturday, April 26
      10 AM – 5 PM: The New School
         Theresa Lang Center and Dorothy Hirshon Suite: 55 W 13 St.
         The Auditorium at 66 W 12 St.
         Anna Maria and Stephen Kellen Auditorium, 66 5th Avenue.
      6 PM – 10 PM: CultureHub, 47 Great Jones Street

   Sunday, April 27
      10 AM – 6 PM: The New School
         Theresa Lang Center and Dorothy Hirshon Suite: 55 W 13 St.

NOTE: Registration and check-in will take place at Theresa Lang Center on both Saturday and Sunday.  See remixnyc.com.

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A Month Since Internet Archive Fire -- Donations Being Matched 3-to-1 before 2014!

It's been a little over a month since the November 6th fire that destroyed the scanning center building at the Internet Archive.  No one was hurt, but as Archive founder Brewster Kahle wrote in a blog post from November 6th (emphasis added):

We lost maybe 20 boxes of books and film, some irreplaceable, most already digitized, and some replaceable.   From our point of view this is the worst part.   We lost an array cameras, lights, and scanning equipment worth hundreds of thousands of dollars.  Insurance will cover some but not all of this.

The Internet Archive is far more important to the long-term interests of Internet users than, say, Facebook, and they'll make a little go a long way.  If you can, please donate to help them recover and grow.  I just sent in a check for $200 -- which really means $800 for the Archive, because...

Donations made before 2014 are being matched three-to-one by an anonymous donor!

So, if you can, please give.  There are few more obvious calls on the Internet right now!

Internet Archive, showing fire damage to scanning center building.

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Eben Moglen talks in New York City: "Snowden and the Future".

Eben Moglen speaking.Eben Moglen will be giving a series of four public talks in New York City, entitled "Snowden and the Future", starting Wednesday, October 4th (the other dates are Oct. 30th, Nov 13th, and Dec 4th, all Wednesdays).

All talks will take place at Columbia Law School, in room 101 of Jerome Greene Hall (map), from 4:30pm - 5:30pm.  For those who can't be there, streaming video of the events as they take place will be available from snowdenandthefuture.info.

Why you should go to these talks:

The connection between copyright restrictions and civil liberties violations is clear and unavoidable.  We've written about it here (and here and here and here).  It's been the key to the Pirate Party's political success in Europe, and the subject of one of Nina Paley's excellent minute memes.  Eben Moglen,  the founder and director of the Software Freedom Law Center, is one of the clearest thinkers talking about digital freedom today -- and one of the most inspiring: a previous public lecture of his led directly to the creation of the Freedom Box Foundation.  He's also a terrific speaker.  You won't be disappointed; go, and bring all your friends.

The surveillance state is aided and enabled by information monopolists who assert that watching people's Internet usage for unauthorized use of copyrighted material is so important that it trumps both privacy concerns and freedom of expression.  That's why we keep a close eye on surveillance news here at QuestionCopyright.org, and encourage you to as well.

For more information on these lectures, visit snowdenandthefuture.info.

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We Pledged $500 to the Tupi Animation Software Kickstarter campaign -- join us?

Tupi logo.

QuestionCopyright.org has pledged $500.00 to the Tupi 2D Animation Software Kickstarter campaign, and we're posting this to help spread the word.

Please join us and the other project backers, with whatever amount you can pledge!  Remember, your pledge is only called in if Tupi reaches their $30,000 goal by September 26th.

Tupi is already runnable code.  They're on version 0.2 right now, and their goal in this campaign is to reach their 1.0 feature set, including installers for Macintosh and Windows.  (It's already packaged for Debian and Ubuntu GNU/Linux; I've installed it.)

Our Artist-in-Residence Nina Paley (who also backed Tupi's campaign personally) explained very well why projects like Tupi are important, in her post "It's 2013.  Do you know where my Free vector animation software is?".  When you're an artist, you're dependent on your tools — and that means when someone has a monopoly over your tools, they can play havoc with your art and your livelihood.  That's exactly what happened with Adobe's Macromedia Flash 8.  Read Nina's post for the details, but basically Adobe decided to remove features from their Flash authoring software, in order to sell those features separately in other programs.  As Nina points out, the problem with this isn't just the extra expense, it's the increase in workload and production time.  And the looming threat that they might do it again in the next version.  They can yank the rug out from under their users at any time, and there's nothing the users can do about it, except refuse to upgrade (which becomes less and less feasible as time goes on, of course).

Free, open source programs can't do this to their users, because no one has a monopoly over the software.  If one group puts out a version of the software that is missing important features, users will shrug and start using a competing fork that treats them better.  It also means that if enough artists need a particular bugfix or improvement in the software, they have a path to make it happen — they don't have to be programmers, as long as they can band together and hire programmers.  Users are not vulnerable to arbitrary decisions handed down from management, they way they are with proprietary software.  (Of course, the more likely scenario is that artists would band together and just pay Tupi's original development team to make the necessary changes.  The fact that the users have the option to go elsewhere is precisely what makes the original authors likely to be responsive to true demand — a free-market ideal that proprietary software is structurally biased against attaining.)

Tupi has another thing going for it: Nina, an extremely experienced animator who knows the major competing proprietary tool very well, has publicly volunteered to test and provide feedback to open source animation projects, including Tupi.  (Nina says "Tupi’s strength is its simplicity; it’s great for kids and anyone new to animation. It doesn’t yet have the power I need to produce feature films, but its development is a good thing for all of us. ...")

So please help spread the word about Tupi's Kickstarter campaign! (Here are links to retweet or redent our posts about it.)  You can read more about Tupi here, and this is their campaign video:

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